2d Circuit Court Issues Blueprint for Avoiding Misclassification; Business Owners Classifying Workers as Independent Contractors

The United States Court of Appeals for the 2d Circuit recently issued a decision that could potentially save certain business owners both money and stress. The 2d Circuit, which encompasses the states of New York, Connecticut, and Vermont, in a recently decided case (Saleem v. Corporate Transportation Group, Ltd.) provided guidelines for employers as to whether their workers are employees or independent contracts. The issue of classification of workers as an employee or independent contractor is significant. For example, an independent contractor is exempt from minimum wage and overtime requirements. Further, such a classification can have significant tax consequences for a business. The above-referenced case clarifies longstanding issues regarding classification workers as employees or independent contractors. The hope is that the by issuing said guidelines, the Court will help employers avoid troublesome allegations of misclassification.

The case involved a driver service and its workers. Corporate Transportation Group and its affiliate companies (CTG) run a black-car service in the New York City area. The Company requires its drivers to sign a contract that acknowledged they were “not an employee or agent” of the company “but merely a subscriber to the services offered” by CTG. The drivers filed a class action lawsuit against CTG seeking unpaid overtime pay pursuant to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and New York state wage and hour law.

In its decision, the Court established a three pronged analysis for determining whether a worker is an independent contractor or an employee. The Court initially noted that any independent contractor misclassification dispute arising under the FLSA must be examined under an “economic realities” test. The Court then listed the following three factors to be crucial to its decision:

  1. The Drivers Had Entrepreneurial Opportunities Not Available to Employees;
  2. The Drivers Made A Heavy Investment In Their Business and;
  3. The Drivers Maintained A High Level Of Flexibility.

The Court cautioned however, that its ruling was based on the fact-specific “totality of the circumstances” comprising the relationship between CTG and the drivers in this specific case. “In a different case, and with a different record, an entity that exercised similar control over clients, fees, and rules enforcement in ways analogous to CTG might well constitute an employer within the meaning of the FLSA.”

As a result it is clear that each case is to be determined on a case by case basis. Further, there is a lot of gray area as to how each of the above-referenced guidelines may be applied to difference business. Each case can turn on several variables. It is always best to consult an experienced employment attorney. If you have questions regarding employee or independent contractor classificication status, or are facing potential misclassification issues, call Gilbert Law Group today at 631.630.0100.

Uber Misclassification? Employee or Independent Contractor?

In July 2015, the Department of Labor issued guidelines regarding the “misclassification” of workers. It argued that any worker who is “economically dependent” on the employer should be considered an employee. A worker who is involved in a business independently however, on behalf of himself or herself should be regarded as an independent contractor. Multiple factors are considered in determining whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor. This test is sometimes referred to as the “economic realities test.”

The classification of a worker as either an employee or independent contractor is significant for a company and its workers. The rationale behind such classification is that employees should be better protected and entitled to benefits as they are financially and professionally dependent on their employer. Independent contractors, however, are seen as having their own business and thus cannot claim several benefits from the business for which they are providing services including, but not limited to, minimum wage, overtime compensation, family and medical leave, unemployment insurance, and protections ensuring a safe workplace. As such, whether a business classifies its staff as employees or independent contractors will inevitably have major implications as it relates to overhead, payroll, profit margins, and taxes.

This classification again became newsworthy for Uber drivers when Uber, an on-demand car service, was confronted with the issue of whether its drivers should be considered independent contractors or employees. It is Uber’s longstanding practice of classifying its drivers as independent contractors rather than employees. Now the California Labor Commissioner, presented with this specific question, has opposed, in its interpretation of law, Uber’s basic and longstanding practice.

On September 16, 2014, an Uber driver named Barbara Ann Berwick filed a wage complaint with the California Labor Commissioner. Berwick sought, among other things, reimbursement for business expenses, such as gas and bridge tolls. Uber argued that since Berwick was not an employee, she could not be compensated for such expenses. In June 2015, the California Labor Commissioner argued in favor of the driver. It disagreed with Uber and awarded Berwick over $4,000 in business expenses and interest. In arriving at its decision, the Labor Commissioner applied the “economic realities” test adopted by the California Supreme Court in S. G. Borello& Sons, Inc. v. Department of Industrial Relations. Variations of this “economic realities” test are applied throughout the country, including New York. Based on this multifactor test, the Labor Commissioner held that Berwick was in fact an employee. Uber lost the case but has appealed the Commissioner’s decision.

            If you have questions regarding the classification of employees, independent contractors, and the implications of either classification, or need advice regarding labor and employment law, please call Gilbert Law Group at 631.630.0100.

Contributed by Sakine Oezcan

Department of Labor Issues New Worker Misclassification Guidelines: Whether a Worker is an Employee or Independent Contractor?

The Department of Labor (DOL) has issued new guidelines, Administrator’s Interpretation 2015-1 detailing its interpretation of the “economic realities” test as it relates to the misclassification of workers. The guidance expands on the six factors in the test, emphasizing that the main issue is whether the worker is “economically dependent on the employer or truly in business for him or herself.” The vague definition of “employ” found in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) combined with the totality of the circumstances considered in the test means that most workers are considered employees, the DOL commented. The expansive reading of what constitutes an employee will likely generate an increase not only in DOL oversight but worker lawsuits as well. The DOL has been cracking down on worker misclassification by issuing severe penalties on employer’s who label a worker as an independent contractor rather than an employee for the consequential tax benefits. So how does one determine whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor?

“In sum, most workers are employees under the FLSA’s broad definitions,” the DOL said. “The very broad definition of employment under the FLSA as ‘to suffer or permit to work’ and the Act’s intended expansive coverage for workers must be considered when applying the economic realities factors to determine whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor. The factors should not be analyzed mechanically or in a vacuum, and no single factor, including control, should be over-emphasized. Instead, each factor should be considered in light of the ultimate determination of whether the worker is really in business for him or herself (and thus is an independent contractor) or is economically dependent on the employer (and thus its employee). The factors should be used as guides to answer that ultimate question of economic dependence.”

The six factor test is complex, and many times whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor can turn on several variables. For help navigating through issues related to worker misclassification and whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor, call Gilbert Law Group today at (631)630-0100.